Salt Agreement

Salt Agreement

Status SALT II Negotiations began in November 1972. A major breakthrough was made at the November 1974 meeting in Vladivostok between President Ford and Secretary General Brezhnev. At that meeting, the parties agreed on a fundamental framework for the SALT II agreement. The SALT II agreement was signed in Vienna on 18 June 1979 by President Carter and Secretary General Brezhnev. President Carter sent it to the Senate on June 22 for review and approval of ratification. On January 3, 1980, President Carter asked the Senate majority leader to delay consideration of the treaty in the Senate in the face of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. In May 1982, President Reagan declared that he would do nothing to undermine the salts agreements as long as the Soviet Union shows the same restraint. The Soviet Union once again declared itself ready to comply with the un ratified treaty. In 1984 and 1985, President Reagan declared that the Soviet Union had breached its political obligation to abide by the SALT II Treaty. On May 26, 1986, President Reagan declared: „… the United States must base its decisions on the strategic structure of its troops on the nature and extent of the threat of the Strategic Forces of the Soviet Union, and not on standards in the structure of the SALT… This was the first agreement between the United States and the USSR that limited and restricted their nuclear weapons systems.

The link between strategic arms restrictions and outstanding issues such as the Middle East, Berlin and especially Vietnam has become the central focus of Nixon and Kissinger`s détente policy. By making connections, they hoped to change the nature and direction of American foreign policy, including the U.S. policy of nuclear disarmament and arms control, and separate it from those practiced by Nixon`s predecessors. They also intended to make U.S. gun control policy part of the pull-up by The Link. […] Its link policy had indeed failed. It failed mainly because it was based on erroneous assumptions and erroneous premises, which the Soviet Union wanted above all a strategic arms control agreement, far more than the United States. [9] Negotiations began in November 1969 in Helsinki, Finland. [1] SALT I resulted in the anti-ballistic missile treaty and an interim agreement between the two countries. Although SALT II reached an agreement in 1979, the U.S.

Senate decided not to ratify the treaty in response to the Soviet war in Afghanistan, which took place later that year. Nor has the Soviet legislature ratified it. The agreement expired on December 31, 1985 and was not renewed. The resulting set of agreements (SALT I) included the Ballistic Missile Systems (ABM) Treaty and the Interim Agreement and Protocol on the Limitation of Strategic Offensive Weapons. Both were signed by President Richard M. Nixon for the United States and Leonid Brezhnev, General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, for the U.S.S.R. on May 26, 1972 at a summit in Moscow. For external and internal reasons, the parties have long been unable to engage in substantive discussions on this issue for external and internal reasons.